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The ManyTracks Orchard


Elderberry

 

Sambucus canadensis

 

Four decades of Growing Good Food in Michigan's Upper Peninsula
Down to Earth Information, Experiences, Thought

 


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OTHER FRUIT
 

Aronia 

Cornelian Dogwood

Elderberry

Gooseberry

Juneberry

Mulberry

Bob Gordon
Goodbarn
Wyldewood
 


2022 - Wyldwood regrew well, blossomed, no fruit. May try transplanting it next spring to right next to Goodbarn.

Goodbarn again regrew nicely, many blossoms, no fruit.

Bob Gordon not thriving but still alive.


2021 -    


2020 - Dug up Wyldewood, looks like good roots, transplanted to maybe better spot. Transplant didn't grow but later original grew.

Goodbarn top winterkill as usual, good regrowth.

Bob Gordon slow to grow.


2019 - planted Bob Gordon - S. canadensis, from Indiana Berry. Collected from wild by Robert Gordon, Charlotte Cooper and Andrew Thomas near Osceola, Missouri 1999. Berries ripen uniformly, resistant to shattering , huge clusters. Pendulous flower heads. Fruit can grow on new canes.

Wyldewood grew but shoots tender, broke off or died one by one until all gone. Stuck some in nursery. One from fall survived and growing nicely.

Goodbarn flowering, short but healthy, grew another shoot.


2018 - planted Wyldewood - S. canadensis hybrid, from Indiana Berry. Collected from wild by Jack Millican in 1995, east-central Oklahoma. Needs cross-pollination, recommends Bob Gordon. Harvest season 2-3 weeks later than others. Heavy yielding, efficient to harvest. aka Brush Hills. Grew 12-24" but in fall still half green, froze.

Goodbarn growing nicely, lots of branches, short but bushy 22" ^. Flowering and had a scattering of fruit!


2015-17 - planted Goodbarn - Sambucus canadensis - from Fedco 2015 (along with York which later winterkilled). Transplanted 2017. Chance seedling, Elwyn Meader introduction,  "a good plant growing under the eaves of his barn in New Hampshire". Hardy, apparently self fertile, vigorous, lower grower ~ 5 ft.



Copyright Susan Robishaw


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Have you read  "Frost Dancing - Tips from a Northern Gardener" ? A fun short read.

or "Homesteading Adventures"    Creating our backwoods homestead--the first 20 years.

and "Growing Berries for Food and Fun"   A journey you can use in your own garden.