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The ManyTracks Orchard


Helmer Pear

unknown seedling from Helmer, Idaho, early 1900's

 

#1 grafted 2022 on Oikos Ecos rootstock

#2 grafted two on Chokepear south 2022


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PEARS

Chokepear

Cutler
Helmer

L'Anse

Nova

Patten

Sierra

Southworth

Stacey

Summercrisp

pear grafts
 


Discovered growing on an old homestead in west-central Idaho near Helmer. Fruit good size and quality, appears to be self-fertile. Not a Bartlett. Possibly a Duchess de Montfort, or likely just a seedling.



2022 - End May grafted Helmer scion (from Bob Purvis). #1 on two fresh growth on Chokepear. Grew healthy, vigorous, ~24".

#2 in NEOrchard on OikosEcos rootstock (planted 2018), on short year-old shoot at about 4 ft high. Grew well, healthy, ~14".


2021 - NEOrch. seedling doing fine.


2020 - NEOrchard tree wintered well, looks good.    Inside tree dug and Cutler root-grafted to it in April. See Cutler Pear.


2019 - Inside tree top winterkilled but regrew well. Was going to let it grow & top-graft but will root-graft something now as maybe its not as hardy as I'd hoped.  See Cutler Pear.

NEOrchard tree no winterkill, looks healthy.


2018 - Rootstock purchased from Oikos, planted in fall for rootstock. Planted one in se area inside fence to graft to later, and one in NEOrchard to let grow as is [later decided to graft - see 2022].

 "Ecos pears were developed from a single tree in Michigan whose Pakistani origins crossed with neighboring Asian and European pears creating this massive genetic mix. Fruits vary from 1-3 inch in size. Fruit is tart and delicious processed into sauce. Tolerant to every soil type except wet. Often used for deer and birds. Some fruits remains in good condition until November and December. Others degrade quickly dropping starting in early September. Some of the selections will stay hung up in  the trees throughout December and January where winter birds eat them as the fruits blet and become mush like. The fruits are also used Processed into jam, jelly or drink, the flavors are similar to a quince mixed with crabapple."



Copyright Susan Robishaw
 


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Have you read  "Frost Dancing - Tips from a Northern Gardener" ? A fun short read.

or "Homesteading Adventures"    Creating our backwoods homestead--the first 20 years.

and "Growing Berries for Food and Fun"   A journey you can use in your own garden.