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The ManyTracks Orchard


Collet Apple


 

unknown parentage, seeds from Morden Research Station, Manitoba, 1934, selected 1947

 

Grafted 2019 -- (#1) old Beacon sucker (inside)
 (#2) buried low graft, unknown seedling (NOrch)

 

 

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"Discovered and propagated by Albert Collet and Sister Alice from Notre-Dame-de Lourdes in Manitoba. In 1934, they gathered 300 apple seeds from the Morden Research Center of Manitoba and planted them all. Of the 300 apple trees propagated, 35 survived the cold winters. Whilst visually appealing, only one was producing a delicious and big fruit in high quantity. After 13 years of testing its resistance to cold weather, in temperatures as low as -52F), they finally released it to be propagated."



2021 - #1 - Continues vigorous, healthy, good form. Pruned off low branch.   

 #2 -  Looks good, smaller than similarly planted Valentine in same area but doing fine.


2020 - #1 - excellent, vigorous growth ~5'^.     #2 - good growth, healthy.


2019 - ARS-NPGS scion. #1 - side graft 5/30 to old Beacon3 sucker (by windmill) @~24". Grew vigorously, top ~15", sides 7" & 10" & 3". Has lot of roots to draw from!

#2 - Bench graft 5/27 very low on seedling rootstock (dug up from center lilac area by house, roots with hairs), planted burying graft in North East Orchard.



Online notes: (konrad) annual producer and reliable at home, a little slow grower, took about 4 years to fruit but never rested one year, it is self thinning. Cooked about half is soft and the rest a bit firm. (HFT) taste some similarities with McIntosh. ranges more tart to more sweet depending on harvest time, but always well-balanced and delicious. firm and juicy, equally good eaten raw or cooked. Avoid harvesting it too early as the cold will increase its sugar content. The tree: resistance to disease, to scab, light sensitivity to fireblight.  (ARS-GRIN) greenish cream, uniformly streaked with bright medium red. Turns rose-pink when ripe, early Oct. Good cooking, excellent dessert. Resembles Godfrey. "Frost triggers release of sugars if harvested too early" per Evans. Will stand 5-10 degrees F. of frost. Keeps about 10 weeks. Minn"test" Winter ‘95-’96 (coldest on record at that time) - Apple Survival Collet in "worst" category (along with Sw Sixt & Prairie Spy.... Few "best).  T3 vigor.


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Have you read  "Frost Dancing - Tips from a Northern Gardener" ? A fun short read.

or "Homesteading Adventures"    Creating our backwoods homestead--the first 20 years.

and "Growing Berries for Food and Fun"   A journey you can use in your own garden.